An Apprenticeship – by Clarice Lispector

In Disorganisation & Sex (2022) Jamieson Webster proposes that a disavowed undercurrent of psychoanalytic thought is that sex, like desire, is inherently ‘disorganising,’ and is therefore faithful to the psychoanalytic process which aims not to ‘re-organise’ an individual who might be suffering from an unruly (because unconscious) desire, but instead seeks the ‘alignment of the … Continue reading An Apprenticeship – by Clarice Lispector

Schopenhauer’s Porcupines – by Deborah Anna Luepnitz

For anyone wanting to understand how psychoanalytic psychotherapy works from within the consulting room, this book is brilliant. Whilst telling the intimate and detailed stories of work with her patients (who have all consented to her doing so, of course), Dr Luepnitz also draws on and elucidates complex psychoanalytic concepts from Winnicott, Freud, and Lacan, … Continue reading Schopenhauer’s Porcupines – by Deborah Anna Luepnitz

Brief Interpersonal Dynamic Therapy

  Though working in IAPT, a CBT-dominant mental health service, if you have read any of my posts before you'll know that my temperament aligns far more naturally with the dynamic, interpersonal and exploratory therapeutic modalities. This means I often find myself in unpleasant moral dilemmas where I worry that I am short-changing my clients … Continue reading Brief Interpersonal Dynamic Therapy

Book Review: ‘Man’s Search for Meaning’ by Viktor Frankl

This book is divided into two parts. The first part is an autobiographical account of Viktor Frankl’s time in concentration camps during the second World War, and the second part is a more academic exposition of the type of psychotherapy that he created, Logotherapy. He begins the book with an admission that ‘This book does … Continue reading Book Review: ‘Man’s Search for Meaning’ by Viktor Frankl

Book Review: ‘The Adolescent Psyche’ by Richard Frankel

This book is filled with wisdom, and I think it would be helpful for any mental health professional working with adolescents (regardless of their preferred brand of therapeutic approach) so I’ll attempt to summarise its main points: The Freudian psychoanalysts were wrong to treat adolescence as primarily a return to infantile id drives/impulses (only with … Continue reading Book Review: ‘The Adolescent Psyche’ by Richard Frankel

Book Review – ‘Madness and Modernism’ by Louis Sass (2017 Ed.)

This ground-breaking work revises traditional understandings of schizophrenia as ‘a form of encroaching dementia, regression, or dominance by instinct and the irrational’ and instead views it as ‘involving unusual forms of self-consciousness together with associated alienation and withdrawal – not only from the surrounding world and other human beings, but also from one’s own thoughts, … Continue reading Book Review – ‘Madness and Modernism’ by Louis Sass (2017 Ed.)

Quotes from Freud (Standard Edition, Complete Works, Vol. XXI)

The Future of an Illusion (1927) ‘There are two widespread human characteristics which are responsible for the fact that the regulations of civilization can only be maintained by a certain degree of coercion – namely, that men are not spontaneously fond of work and that arguments are of no avail against their passions.’ (8) I … Continue reading Quotes from Freud (Standard Edition, Complete Works, Vol. XXI)

Louis Sass on Wittgenstein and Freud

[This blog captures my initial thoughts while reading Louis Sass's chapter in Wittgenstein, Theory and the Arts (eds. R. Allen & M. Turvey), titled: 'Wittgenstein, Freud, and the Nature of Psychoanalytic Explanation'. The bracketed page numbers are from that book.] Louis Sass begins by acknowledging the complex relationship Wittgenstein seemed to have with Freud and … Continue reading Louis Sass on Wittgenstein and Freud

Book Review: ‘By Grand Central Station I sat Down and Wept’ by Elizabeth smart

During times of crises, one might think that we would be reminded of the triviality of our small, personal problems, but I think that one of the many things that the current Covid-19 pandemic has taught us is that our human responses aren't always so rational. Over the last two weeks, as the severity of … Continue reading Book Review: ‘By Grand Central Station I sat Down and Wept’ by Elizabeth smart