Mysterious Pain

‘Just try – in a real case – to doubt someone else’s fear or pain!’(303. Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations) Recently I’ve been bothered by a few mysterious and troublesome physical health problems, which has meant lots of doctor’s calls and appointments, but with little clarification. Luckily, my problem is minor, and its main annoyance is … Continue reading Mysterious Pain

Are We Fudging IAPT Data?

In my PWP training today we were taught how we are supposed to record our targets and recovery rate data, and I think I've just realised one way that IAPT services might potentially be overestimating their success rates... We were told that if, by the end of the 6 Low Intensity CBT sessions we offer … Continue reading Are We Fudging IAPT Data?

‘Epistemic Injustice’ in Therapy?

Most of the time I spend scrolling through Twitter is probably time I won't ever get back, but the other day I 'overheard' an interesting conversation between two academics on what one said was psychological therapy's primary aim: constructing a sense of dignity, and the other academic voicing the opinion that in fact, therapy often … Continue reading ‘Epistemic Injustice’ in Therapy?

Louis Sass on Wittgenstein and Freud

[This blog captures my initial thoughts while reading Louis Sass's chapter in Wittgenstein, Theory and the Arts (eds. R. Allen & M. Turvey), titled: 'Wittgenstein, Freud, and the Nature of Psychoanalytic Explanation'. The bracketed page numbers are from that book.] Louis Sass begins by acknowledging the complex relationship Wittgenstein seemed to have with Freud and … Continue reading Louis Sass on Wittgenstein and Freud

Michael Polanyi on the Arts

I have recently become interested in how the scientist-turned-philosopher Michael Polanyi’s understanding of the arts can help us theorize how creating or appreciating the arts has a role to play in clinical psychology, in particular psychoanalytic or psychodynamic approaches. In his 1958 book Personal Knowledge, as he leads up to a discussion of ‘indwelling’, Polanyi … Continue reading Michael Polanyi on the Arts

A Common Criticism of CBT

Some critics of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) have focussed their attack on its underlying theoretical assumption that our 'beliefs' cause mental distress. That's a pretty easy target, though, once you look at the correlations between factors like poverty, abuse, systemic oppression; and mental distress - in those cases, would you really call their thinking 'faulty' … Continue reading A Common Criticism of CBT